FULLER GENEALOGY

Our FULLER Ancestors

Captain Duncan Graham

Male 1772 - 1847  (75 years)


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  • Name Captain Duncan Graham 
    Title Captain  
    Born 1772  Scotland, UK Find all individuals with events at this location  [1, 2
    • in the Highlands, (according to the source)
    Gender Male 
    Immigration Abt 1794  [3, 4
    Occupation 1802  St Peter's River, Dakota, Minnesota, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [3, 5
    Occupation Abt 1810  Graham's Island, Benson, North Dakota, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [6, 7, 8, 9, 10
    Milit-Beg 1813  [11
    Milit-End 06 Sep 1814  [12, 13, 14
    Residence 1816  [15
    Occupation 01 Feb 1817  [16, 17
    Occupation 1818  [18, 19
    Occupation 1820  [20, 21
    Residence 26 Jun 1827  Prairie du Chien, Crawford, Wisconsin, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [22, 23
    Occupation 09 Feb 1843  Wabasha, Wabasha, Minnesota, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [24
    Reference Number 127 
    Reference Number GRA-GRA 
    Died 05 Dec 1847  Mendota, Dakota, Minnesota, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [2, 25, 26
    Buried 1865  Calvary Cemetery, Faribault, Rice, Minnesota, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [27, 28, 29, 30
    • Originally, on 6 Dec. 1847 his body was placed in the Jean Baptist Faribault family vault at Mendota joined by his wife in 1848. In what must have been a huge operation, the remains of all relatives and near relatives were moved to the family plot at the Calvary Cemetery, Faribault, MN in the winter of 1865 because the new railway line needed the land occupied by the vault. His grave marker read "Duncan Graham, Born in Scotland". That grave marker no longer existed in 2008, as it may have been made of wood.
    Person ID I127  fullereriksen
    Last Modified 2 Nov 2016 

    Family Susanne Istagiwin Ha-za-ho-ta-win Pennishon,   b. Abt 1785, Rum River, Mille Lacs, Minnesota, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 02 Mar 1848, Mendota, Dakota, Minnesota, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 63 years) 
    Married Between 1796 and 1802  Minnesota, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [31, 32
    Children 
    +1. Mary Elizabeth Graham,   b. 15 Jul 1804, Sauk Rapids, Benton, Minnesota, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 08 Apr 1876, Elizabeth, Otter Tail, Minnesota, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 71 years)
    +2. Lucy Nancy Graham,   b. Sep 1805, Mendota, Dakota, Minnesota, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 26 Sep 1888, Fort Totten, Benson, North Dakota, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 83 years)
    +3. Sarah Mary Graham,   b. 1811, Minnesota, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Abt 1841, Wabasha, Wabasha, Minnesota, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 30 years)
    +4. Jane Graham,   b. 1817, St Peter's River, Dakota, Minnesota, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1881, Lake Pepin, Goodhue, Minnesota, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 64 years)
    +5. Alexander Graham, Sr.,   b. 15 Oct 1821, Prairie du Chien, Crawford, Wisconsin, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1866, Faribault, Rice, Minnesota, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 44 years)
    Family ID F53  Group Sheet

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - 1772 - Scotland, UK Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMarried - Between 1796 and 1802 - Minnesota, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsOccupation - 1802 - St Peter's River, Dakota, Minnesota, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsOccupation - Abt 1810 - Graham's Island, Benson, North Dakota, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsResidence - 26 Jun 1827 - Prairie du Chien, Crawford, Wisconsin, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsOccupation - acting postmaster - 09 Feb 1843 - Wabasha, Wabasha, Minnesota, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - 05 Dec 1847 - Mendota, Dakota, Minnesota, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsBuried - 1865 - Calvary Cemetery, Faribault, Rice, Minnesota, USA Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Maps 
     = Link to Google Earth 
    Pin Legend  : Address       : Location       : City/Town       : County/Shire       : State/Province       : Country       : Not Set

  • Photos
    Grahams Island State Park, Devils Lake, North Dakota, USA
    Grahams Island State Park, Devils Lake, North Dakota, USA
    It is widely reported that Duncan Graham had a trading post on this island about 1815 and this State Park is named after him.
    Grahams Island State Park, North Dakota, USA
    Grahams Island State Park, North Dakota, USA
    State Park named after Duncan Graham

    Documents
    Graham, Duncan
Land Petition #75, grants of Land to be made as a result of participation in the 1812-15 War;p.75d.
    Graham, Duncan Land Petition #75, grants of Land to be made as a result of participation in the 1812-15 War;p.75d.
    List of Officers and Interpreters appointed by Robert Dickson according to orders and Instructions from Sir George Prevost Commander of the Forces in Canada
    Captain Duncan Graham 500 acres
    Etc .....................
    Graham, Duncan Land Petition #75 p. 75j
    Graham, Duncan Land Petition #75 p. 75j
    Public Archives Canada: Upper Canada Land Petitions “D” Bundle 12, 1818-1820 (RG 1,L3, Vol. 155).
    Page 75j: ___ Rolls – 19 July 1819, from Mr. Robt. Dickson: Reflecting the grants of Land to be made to the Officers of that branch of the Indian Department which had been under my orders during the late War.

    Headstones
    Graham, Duncan
    Graham, Duncan
    Captain Duncan Graham and his wife Susanna were buried in this plot. The markers had disappeared at the time of this picture (2008)
    Plot: Faribault Plot

    Histories
    Graham, Duncan, an Historical Profile
    Graham, Duncan, an Historical Profile
    The Life and Times of Captain Duncan Graham

  • Notes 
    • He was well educated as demonstrated by his letters written while employed by the Hudson's Bay Company in Canada. It has also been reported that his parents were members of the Scottish nobility and that his emigration was a protest against society of the day.
    • At the end of the war he was initially barred from entering the USA, however was eventually allowed to join his wife and children. H.H. Sibley claimed that he was given USA citizenship at some point.
    • After the war we know that he worked as a trader for the Hudson's Bay Company as we have a copy of their ledger showing an advance of money at Montreal in 1815 with the last entry being in 1820. We also have copies of letters between Graham and HBC officials and others referencing Graham during the same time period.
    • purchased trading items || because we have a copy of his itemized purchases from the Sibley Trading Post papers for that date
    • was a signatory to a petition sent to the president of the USA for restitution for lands that they had settled between the falls of St Anthony and the mouth of the Minnesota River, which were to be taken for military reserve.
    • was present at the baptisms of his daughter Sarah and son Alexander at St Peter's Catholic Church at Mendota
    • In 1834 he retired to the Wabasha, MN where his three youngest daughters lived and for a number of years was engaged in carrying the mail between Prairie du Chien and points as far north as the Red River of the North.
    • named the town of Wabasha MN (originally Wabashaw), after his wife's grandfather, Chief Wapashaw I.
    • the Historical Society of ND - Vol 3, published a picture of three of Graham's four daughters and in a biography of Duncan Graham on page 217 named the four daughters, all whom married prominent men in the history of the State of Minnesota; Mrs [Mary Elizabeth] Alexander Faribault, Mrs [Lucy Nancy] Joseph Buisson, Mrs [Sarah Mary] Oliver Cratte and Mrs [Jane] James Wells.

  • Sources 
    1. [S33] NDHS, "Ninety Six Years Among the Indians of the Northwest" North Dakota History, Volume XV, Jan-Oct 1948, North Dakota Historical Society, (Publisher, North Dakota Historical Society, Bismarck North Dakota, 1948, pp 85-97), GRA-BK2, Section 2., Gra-BK2, section 2, p 88/89.

    2. [S25] Death-Burial Records, St Paul Archdiocese, GRA-GRA, Page 1-1,2., Gra-Gra, p 1-1,2.

    3. [S33] NDHS, "Ninety Six Years Among the Indians of the Northwest" North Dakota History, Volume XV, Jan-Oct 1948, North Dakota Historical Society, (Publisher, North Dakota Historical Society, Bismarck North Dakota, 1948, pp 85-97), GRA-BK2, Section 2., Gra-BK2, section 2, p 89.

    4. [S21] Book, Myths and Legends of the Sioux, McLaughlin, Marie L. McLaughlin, (Bismarck Tribune Company, Bismarck North Dakota, USA, May 1, 1913), Various Family Books., Gra-Gra, p 1-10.

    5. [S32] MHS, "New Light on Old St Peter's and Early St Paul", MN History, Volume VIII, 1927, Minnesota Historical Society, (Published by Minnesota Historical Society, St Paul MN, 1927, page 27), GRA-BK1, Section 1., Gra-BK1, section 1, p 44.

    6. [S27] Book, Andreas - Historical Atlas of the Dakotas, A.T. Andreas, (State Historical Society of North Dakota, Chicago, Illinois, USA, published 1884), Atlas, 1884, Dakota Territory; Roll 04815.

      States: "The earliest knowledge of the Devil's Lake region came through the fur traders who established themselves there as early as 1815. As far as known Capt. Duncan Graham, a Scotchman, was the first of these. He settled on Graham's Island where he built a trading post immediately succeeding the war of 1812-1815, and continued there for a number of years. A granddaughter of Graham [Marie J. Buisson], now the wife of Major Cramsie, the Indian agent, is living at Fort Totten. Remains of the old post are still visible. Graham's Island was named for this man."; Gra-Gra, p 1-5 +.

    7. [S34] NDHS, "Recollections and Reminiscences of Graham's Island" North Dakota History, Volume 16, Jan-Apr-Jul 1949, North Dakota Historical Society, (Publisher, North Dakota Historical Society, Bismarck North Dakota, 1949, pp 1-13), GRA-BK2, Section 4., Pages and 1 and 2 state: "After the war [1812-1815] he engaged in hunting and trapping. The story told by these grandchildren [Mrs. James McLaughlin and Antoine Buisson] gives some additional light on the first settler of this Island. He made his headquarters there for hunting and trapping but, being an independent trapper [not connected with the Hudson's Bay Company or the American Fur Company], he was not very successful."; Gra-BK2, section 4, p 1,2.

    8. [S26] NDHS Vol III-Biographies of Early Settlers on Graham's Island, North Dakota Historical Society, (Tribune, State Publishers and Binders, Bismarck North Dakota, 1910 - edited by O.J. Libby), GRA-BK2, Section 3., "Sketch of Capt. Duncan Graham" p217; The footnote 1/2 states: "Antoine Buisson of Fort Totten, ND says that his mother, Mr Graham's second eldest daughter, was twelve years old when her father moved from the Island after about one year's residence there. As her mother died in 1888 at the age of 83, that would fix the date of Mr Graham leaving the Island, 1817. However, other members of the family believer that it was earlier."

      "The Settlement of Graham's Island" p201 states: "Of all communities of North Dakota, probably none has a history more singular than the settlement on Graham's Island. The locality derives its name from Captain Duncan Graham, who resided there temporarily in the early part of the nineteenth century, probably not long after the War of 1812."; Gra- Bk2, sec 3, page 201/217.

    9. [S33] NDHS, "Ninety Six Years Among the Indians of the Northwest" North Dakota History, Volume XV, Jan-Oct 1948, North Dakota Historical Society, (Publisher, North Dakota Historical Society, Bismarck North Dakota, 1948, pp 85-97), GRA-BK2, Section 2., Page 90 states: "Sometime before 1812 he established a post near the present site of Grand Forks, ND and a few years later he established another one near the present site of Fargo, ND."; Gra-Bk2, Section 2, P 2-90.

    10. [S95] Book: Kinship of Another Kind, 1997, Gary Clayton Anderson, (Minnesota Historical Society Press, Minneapolis, MN, USA, 1997), Fuller Book Collection., Page xv of the Introduction states: "The coming if the British in the 1770s and the Americans in the early 1880s brought change. Nevertheless, a series of kinship connections increasingly dominated economic relationships to such an extent that individual European explorers and fur traders married into established bands, creating long-lasting peace and friendship bonds with the Dakota people. Americans benefited from these relationships and continues to develop kinship connections among the Dakota after 1800. Inherent in the book's thesis is the argument that these kinship ties were based upon reciprocity -- the idea that goods and services were exchanged between Indians and whites without much regard to value because it was the exchange itself that cemented the relationship. Reciprocity, more than a market or growing economic dependency, characterized the early fur trade and Indian-white relationship."

      Page xxvii of the Preface says: "Almost all whites who entered Minnesota after 1650 became, in the Sioux sense, kinsmen who were adopted into a band and given kin names in order to be viewed as friends or allies. But European kinsmen were expected to share and exchange resources so as to make the community strong, an economic obligation commonly found in communal societies. They in turn could expect assistance from their Dakota relatives in time of need. Once a trader received his kin name, he was formally considered a part of the Dakota 'tiyospaye', or lodge group. The family relationship, based upon trust, reciprocal sharing of resources, or blood ties, had special meaning to the Sioux, since kinship relations dictated behavior patterns and the way other people were treated."; Fuller Book Collection.

    11. [S29] WHS, "Traditions and Recollections of Prairie du Chein" - WI History, Volume IX, 1882, Wisconsin Historical Society, (David Atwood, State Printer, Madison, WIS, 1882, pp 262-300), GRA-BK1, Section 4., The footnote on page 299 states, "he was an officer in the British Indian Department, and was present in command of a party of Dakota or Sioux warriors, composing a portion of the force that was defeated by Col. Croghan at Lower Sandusky, Ohio."

      The footnote also states "Grigon's narrative in the 3rd Vol of this Wis. His. Collections state;" "Gen H.H. Sibley of St Paul, writes to the editor of this work: "I knew Capt. Graham well, he was the father-in-law of Alexander Faribault, lately deceased, who was the founder of the flourishing town that bears his name. He became a citizen of the US subsequent to the war and traded with the Indians for many years. For several years before his passing his leisure days in going from one part of this wild region to another, being a man of remarkable physical vigor, although of slight build."

      The footnote further states; "Mr. Neil in his 1882 History of Minnesota, relates, on the authority of Gen. Sibley, that the crop of 1819 having failed in Lord Selkirk's Colony on the Red River, Duncan Graham, with one Laidlaw, was employed in the spring of 1820 to conduct three boats from Prairie du Chein, laden with 200 bushels of wheat,100 oats, 35 of peas to Pembina. This timely supply cost Lord Selkirk about $6000."

      Also "Capt. Graham was a native of the Highlands of Scotland, descendant from a good family. He appears to have shared with Robert Dixon and the Indians in the campaign of 1813 on the Maumee and at Ft Stevenson, and the next year at Prairie du Chein and Rock River Rapids."; Gra-BK1, section 4, p 298, 299.

    12. [S24] MHS - Minnesota History Society, Minnesota Historical Society, (Minnesota Historical Society, A Quarterly Magazine, St Paul, MN), Gra-Bk1.,
      Volume VIII, 1927, Page 44 states:
      " On the side of the British, Graham fought in several campaigns in the 1812 war. He distinguished himself on September 6, 1814 by driving back Major Zachary Taylor in the battle of Credit Island in the Mississippi opposite Davenport. At the time he was a lieutenant in command of a three pounder and two swivels with a number of Indian auxiliaries serving under him. He was cited for Meritorious conduct in this affair, and later was promoted to captaincy because of his victory. He was granted extensive land by the British government for his service, but never realized anything because of litigation."; Gra-BK1, section 1, p 44.

    13. [S35] WHS, "T.G. Anderson Journal & Narrative" - WI History, Volume IX, 1882, Wisconsin Historical Society, (David Atwood, State Pringer, Madison, WIS, 1882, page 207 forward), GRA-BK1, Section 4., The following is a summary taken from the Personal Narrative and Journal of Captain Thomas G. Anderson's (Duncan Graham's boss):

      1800 Prairie du Chien, in Wisconsin had traditionally been a British trading post.

      1810-1814 - The Americans would not permit British traders to carry goods into Indian territory within the USA - even though they were willing to pay the duty. The British traders traveled with armed escorts to get to Prairie du Chien p178

      1814, April/May - word was received that the Americans had built a fort at Prairie du Chien p193

      1814, June 24 - Duncan Graham is listed as an officer at Fort Mackinaw. p264

      1814, June - Anderson (fur trader) was made a Captain in the army and led a force against the Americans and recaptured Prairie du Chien, taking 65 prisoners. p194-6

      1814, Aug 23 - Graham was a lieutenant stationed at Fort McKay (Prairie du Chien). Indians reported that 8 American gun boats were heading north up the Mississippi to recapture the fort, so Graham was dispatched with 6 British volunteers and 1200 Indians to engage them. p211-216

      1814, Sept 5 - There are several letters between Graham and Anderson describing the situation.

      1814, Sept 6 - In a letter dated Sept 7 written from the battle ground, Graham describes in detail how they chose the best spot for an engagement just at the rapids where Rock River enters the Mississippi and when 8 very large American gun boats with about 6-800 men tried to negotiate the rapids, engaged them with heavy fire shooting 50 holes in their boats with their large guns [this is at credit Island in the Mississippi River opposite Davenport today]. The Americans fled south stopping to bury their dead. p226-228

      1814, Sept 14 - In a letter to Lieut. Col. McDougall - Anderson described the battle and recommended Graham be recognized for merit. p230

      [Note]: There is a lot of detail facts here for those interested in military strategy and involving Duncan Graham.; Gra-Bk1, Section 4.

    14. [S36] Book, Officers of British Forces in Canada During the War of 1812-15, L. Homfray Irving, (Welland Tribune, Welland, Ontario, Canada, 1908), GRA-GRA, page 1-14., Canadian Archives Library, Ottawa, p211 "Duncan Graham, Mackinae. Promoted Captain, 6 Sept., 1814."; Gra-Gra, P 1-14/15.

    15. [S24] MHS - Minnesota History Society, Minnesota Historical Society, (Minnesota Historical Society, A Quarterly Magazine, St Paul, MN), Gra-Bk1., Volume 46/3 Fall 1978, Footnote #13 "Journey of a Trip" by Peter Garrioch. Also Nute, ed., in Minnesota History, 4-414,415 states: "On Graham's Point which later became well known as the site of Fort Abercrombie, see Graham to Lord Selkirk, Dec 7, 1816, Selkirk papers, originals in the Public Archives of Canada, microfilm copy in the Minnesota Historical Society."; Gra-BK1, section 3, p 118.

    16. [S39] Letter, Selkirk to Graham 1817, Lord Selkirk, (1 Feb 1817), GRA-GRA, page 1-16,17., This letter places Graham as a trader in the Lake Traverse area for the winter of 1816/17.; Gra-Gra, p 1-16,17.

    17. [S197] Newspaper Article, Wabasha Herald, (January 24, 1876), Gra-Crat,p59;Gra-Gra,p16., Gra-Gra, page 1-16.

    18. [S30] NDHS, "Notes on the Activities of the Hudson's Bay Company in North Dakota" - N D History Volume XII, Number 3, 1945, North Dakota Historical Society, (North Dakota Historical Society, Bismarck North Dakota, 1945, pp 144-158), GRA-BK2, Section I., Page 148 states; "In 1818 a temporary agreement was made between the Hudson's Bay Company and Joseph Ranville and Duncan Graham relative to a joint trade to be carried on between then in the upper parts of the Red River." [the source of that river being Lake Traverse-wlf]

      Pages 151-154 quotes a section from the journal of Bourke: "The following extracts from the Journal kept by John Palmer Bourke, who wintered at Graham's post at Lac Traverse in the Sioux country in 1819/20 ....".

      "1819 - Sept 17, .. Mr [Duncan] Graham intends as the carts are not arrived to go off with the boat so as that he may arrive the sooner at Lac Traver."

      "Nov 3, Made the traverse from ....., Nov 5, .... encamped opposite Mr. [Duncan] Graham's old wintering place ......, Nov 10, Reached the place of our destination but had no House to go into. Mr [Duncan] Graham's wife pitched a leather tent for me and in this I am to remain until Mr Graham's house is finished Nov 17. The men employed preparing wood for a House, Nov 18 ...laid the floor in Mr Graham's house ..., Feb 6 [1820], Messer's Graham & Ranville went to the American Post .., Feb 10, The Gentlemen arrived Mr Graham purchased some tobacco from the Americans..., March 2, Mr Graham & Francois Roy went on a friendly visit to Mr. Moore."; Gra-BK2, section 1, p 148-154.

    19. [S31] MHS, "Hudson's Bay Company Posts" - MN History, Volume 22, Number 3, 1941, Minnesota Historical Society, (Published by Minnesota Historical Society, St Paul MN, 1941, pp 282-85), GRA-BK1, Section 2., Page 282 states: "During the winter of 1819-1820 Graham, Bourke and Joseph Renville maintained a post for the HBC on or near Lake Traverse and the following season Bourke and Renville were there."

      Page 282 states: "Duncan Graham of the HBC has a post near the Wild Rice River prior to 1819, for on Nov 4, [1819] of that year John Brouke proceeded along the "Riviere a Folle" and on Nov 5, passed the river and encamped opposite Mr. Graham's old wintering place."; Gra-BK1, section 2, p 282.

    20. [S31] MHS, "Hudson's Bay Company Posts" - MN History, Volume 22, Number 3, 1941, Minnesota Historical Society, (Published by Minnesota Historical Society, St Paul MN, 1941, pp 282-85), GRA-BK1, Section 2., On page 282 it states: "By 1820 the arrangements between the company on one side and Renville and Graham on the other for the joint trade near Lake Traverse had become unsatisfactory. Graham seems to have entered the service of the Northwest Co. and to have established a rival post on or near Lake Traverse."; Gra-BK1, section 2, p 282.

    21. [S30] NDHS, "Notes on the Activities of the Hudson's Bay Company in North Dakota" - N D History Volume XII, Number 3, 1945, North Dakota Historical Society, (North Dakota Historical Society, Bismarck North Dakota, 1945, pp 144-158), GRA-BK2, Section I., Page 148 states that; In a letter dated Jan 12, 1820 W. Williams, Governor in Chief of Rupert's Land writes to Colonel Robert Dickson: ".... The Sioux Trade has been Very unsuccessful and a great loss has been sustained by the HBC, the furs indifferent and the concern badly conducted by [Duncan] Graham."

      And on the same page - in a letter dated March 11, 1820, he states "....With respect to Mr. [Duncan] Graham and the Sioux trade they appear equally bad, the one in returns and expenses and the other in conduct and bad management." Later in the same letter he states: "...you seem to think that [the venture] may be carried on without loss, if so by all means adopt it, you have my full consent to take any measures you deem necessary, but not to employ Mr. [Duncan] Graham ...."

      On page 154 - "The following extracts from the Journals kept by J.P. Bourke when he was in charge of Lac Traverse during the trading season 1820/21...", "Oct 23, 1820 Arrived at Lake Traverse with all our Goods safe in the Company of Mr. Duncan Graham on the part of the North West Company."

      Page 151 states: "Peter Fidler - Surveyor of the HBC in a report on the Red River District of May, 1919, states that along the height of land dividing the waters flowing into the Gulf of Mexico from those flowing into Hudson Bay there was considerable number of beaver, but being situated on the borders of the Sioux, Souteau [sic] and Cree Country, the different tribes were adverse to hunting there. Fidler adds that Duncan Graham had traded in this region during the three preceding winters (1816/17, 1817/18, 1818/19) but had met with little success in procuring beaver although he had had a large supply of men and goods."

      NOTE- wlf Nov, 2008: This would appear to say that Graham was at Lake Traverse for the winters of 1816 - 1819 with HBC and there in 1820 for the Northwest Co. as the land between Lake Traverse (flows north) and Big Stone Lake (flows south) is likely the high ground that he talks about.; Gra-BK2, section 1, p 148-154.

    22. [S26] NDHS Vol III-Biographies of Early Settlers on Graham's Island, North Dakota Historical Society, (Tribune, State Publishers and Binders, Bismarck North Dakota, 1910 - edited by O.J. Libby), GRA-BK2, Section 3., "Sketch of Cpt. Duncan Graham" p217 states: "By 1827 he was back in Prairie du Chein. In the summer of that year in company with J.B. Layer, he was sent to Fort Snelling to secure reinforcements for the former post , an Indian attack was feared there."; Gra-BK2, section 3, p 217.

    23. [S56] Book, History of Minnesota, 1882, Rev. Edward Duffield Neill, (Minnesota Historical Company, Minneapolis, MN, USA, 1882), GRA-BK3, Section 2., On page 395 it says: "On the 26th of June 1827, Red Bird, with two other Indians, entered the dwelling of a trader at Prairie du Chien by the name of Lockwood, who was absent, and loaded their guns in the kitchen, proceeded to the bedroom of his wife. On their entrance, she crossed the hall into the store, where she found Duncan Graham, a man of influence with the Indians, who induced them to leave."

      Note: wlf - The next pages explain that these Indians then went to another cabin a killed 2 occupants and after some interaction, Duncan Graham went overland to Ft Snelling to report the murders and Col Snelling took his men to the village and ordered the capture of Red Bird.; Gra- Bk3, sec 2, page 395.

    24. [S44] Letter, Graham to Postmaster 1843, Duncan Graham, (9 Feb 1843), Ful-Sum2, pictures., The letter states: "I have to acknowledge the receipt of an appointment from the appointment office appointing me Postmaster of Wabasha to which I beg to state in reply, that I cannot enter into bonds to be bound to all the duty required by law, of a Postmaster, for he trifling sum of from between seven and eight dollars a year, which the quarterly account will show, therefore I must decline accepting the honor you did to me by conferring the appointment. All the duties of the post office shall be attended to as before until further orders is received respecting it. Yours most respectfully, Dunkin Graham, Acting Postmaster."; Gra-Gra, p 1-23.

    25. [S50] Research Notes, MN Genealogical Society, Minnesota Genealogical Society, GRA-GRA, page 1-28+books., This researcher has found that he died at the home of Alexander Faribault.; Gra-Gra, page 1-30.

    26. [S61] Book, Early Pioneers of Minnesota & Rice Co, 1959, Lillie Clara Berg, (Lillie Clara Berg, San Leandro, California, USA, 1959), GRA-FAR3, Section 3., Here she talks about moving the bodies from Mendota to Faribault in 1865.; Gra-FAR3, Section 3, P 75.

    27. [S25] Death-Burial Records, St Paul Archdiocese, GRA-GRA, Page 1-1,2., "On this 6th day of December, 1847 A.D., I the undersigned, declarethat Mr. Duncan Graham,at the age of 75, passed away on 5th day of this month and year and was buried according to the rites of the Catholic Church today. At the time of his death he received the final Sacraments of the Catholic Church" Signature c A. Ravoux; Gra-Gra, p 1-1,2.

    28. [S37] Research Notes, Charles E. Cratte, Charles Edward Cratte, (Received March 7, 1984), GRA-CRAT, page 1-50., Gra-Gra, p 1-24.

    29. [S60] Research Notes, Doris McLean, Doris McLean, GRA-FAR1., Doris had sent this 1937 Newspaper article written by Agnes G. Fredette which tells the life story of Duncan Graham and also gave the location and description of the marker on his grave.; Gra-Gra, p 1-6.

    30. [S61] Book, Early Pioneers of Minnesota & Rice Co, 1959, Lillie Clara Berg, (Lillie Clara Berg, San Leandro, California, USA, 1959), GRA-FAR3, Section 3., When the Milwaukee Railroad was built about 1865, it was routed to run through the bluff in Mendota where Jean Baptiste Faribault had a vault containing the bodies of relatives and near relatives. These bodies had to be moved. That winter sixty teams and sleighs removed the bodies and brought them to Faribault, Minn., where Alexander Faribault had a temporary vault excavated for the bodies until spring burial in the ground he donated for a cemetery, now known as Calvary Cemetery. Over eighty bodies were buried in that plot.; Gra-Far3, Section 3, p 75.

    31. [S33] NDHS, "Ninety Six Years Among the Indians of the Northwest" North Dakota History, Volume XV, Jan-Oct 1948, North Dakota Historical Society, (Publisher, North Dakota Historical Society, Bismarck North Dakota, 1948, pp 85-97), GRA-BK2, Section 2., The document states: "Taking a wife about 1796, Graham married Susan Pennishon, whose Indian name was 'Istagiwin' meaning 'Brown Eyes'. The name had been given to the first cross between the whites and the Santee Indians."; Gra-BK2, section 2, p 89.

    32. [S45] Research Notes, Dr Phillip Graham Reedy Family, Dr Phillip Graham Reedy Family, Ful-Sum2, pictures., Research states: "About 1800 he married Susanne ..... who was known as the Gray Huckleberry woman"; Gra-Gra, p 1-26.